School of Civil Engineering

Project 1. Fracture characteristics of asphalt mixes using high-speed photography

Supervisors:             Dr Mehdi Serati m.serati@uq.edu.au and Dr Ian Van Wijk Ian.VanWijk@aurecongroup.com of Aurecon

Fracturing in asphalt pavement is a nationwide problem faced by every road agency. While new test procedures and monitoring equipment are continuously being developed each year, a better understanding and quantification of cracking of asphalt yet remains topical. This work aims to investigate the failure response of asphalt mixes under various loading conditions (tensile and compressive stresses) captured at high frequencies using a set of ultra-high speech camera system. Application of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique will be then evaluated to understand crack initiation and crack propagation in asphalt mix designs for quality control and quality assurance of asphalt materials.

Project Duration  - 1 or 2 semester project or thesis
Available to  - Civil Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering, Transport Engineering

 

Project 2. High-speed photography for fracture studies of geomaterials

Supervisor:             Dr Mehdi Serati m.serati@uq.edu.au

Fracturing in rock is one of the hot research focuses in rock mechanics since a large number of geotechnical applications such as rock slope stability assessments, tunnel support design and fluid flow prediction can benefit from a greater understanding of rock fracture mechanisms. This work aims to investigate the failure response of rock under various loading conditions (tensile and compressive stresses) captured at high frequencies using a set of ultra-high speech camera system at sampling rates of up to 500,000 frames per second (fps). Image processing techniques will be then used to determine the displacement fields, the cracking patterns, and the fracture parameters. The obtained results will be finally compared against the available theoretical and experimental models. In this project, the student will learn about rock testing principals, and the basics of high-speed photography & image processing techniques (e.g. frame rate, exposure time, illumination, triggering, etc.) for the study of rock crack initiation, propagation, interaction, and eventual coalescence.

Project Duration  - 1 or 2 semester project or thesis
Available to  - Civil Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering

 

Project 3. Utilisation of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method in rock testing

Supervisor:             Dr Mehdi Serati m.serati@uq.edu.au

Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is an innovative, non-contacting, and advanced optical technique for the measurement of strain and displacement parameters within engineering and construction projects. In this study, the applicability of 2D- (in-plane) and 3D-DIC will be assessed for the investigation of rock deformation and crack propagation. During the course of the project, the student will gain knowledge of traditional methods as well as DIC technique for the measurement of rock deformation under loading.

Project Duration  - 2 semester project or thesis
Available to  - Civil Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering

 

Project 4. Investigating the environmental paraments’ impact on rock mechanical properties

Supervisor:             Dr Mehdi Serati m.serati@uq.edu.au

In general, laboratory strength test analyses yield strength estimates for rock samples that are often higher than for similar materials in-situ due to scale effects, the effects of rate of loading, sample shape effects such as length-to-diameter ratio, temperature, unwanted contact friction, anisotropy, and conditions of sample confinement. This project aims to experimentally assess the effect of such environmental paraments on strength testing results of rock.

Project Duration  - 1 or 2 semester project or thesis
Available to  - Civil Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering

 

Project 5. Failure criteria of rock-like materials

Supervisor:             Dr Mehdi Serati m.serati@uq.edu.au

A failure criterion is a mathematical expression that defines the stress state at which the target material will fail, and is usually expressed in terms of the stress tensor and the material properties. This study assesses the applicability of different available failure criteria to conventional triaxial data.

Project Duration  - 1 or 2 semester project or thesis
Available to  - Civil Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering